Tag Archives: snow

Guiding in the Snow

Thursday it started snowing in Jerusalem and I went for a run on a trail behind the Jerusalem Biblical zoo. Took these two photos that I’ve entitled “Green and red in the Snow”.

Pine in snow Red leaves in snow

Friday it snowed most of the day and I guided a group of university students from California in the Old City. Most of the sites in the city were closed. This is a photograph I took from Yemin Moshe of Mount Zion on my way to meet the group at Jaffa gate.

Mount Zion in Snow

Today we returned to the Old City in the morning hoping to visit the Haram el-Sharif but it was closed. Instead we were able to do a tour of the Western Wall Tunnels. Afterwards although the White Fathers compound was closed we did find four churches on our way to the rooftop view at the Austrian Hospice, only to find it closed too.

Then off to Bethlehem in the afternoon. Even with all the snow we had a great couple of days.

Pepperdine University students

Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds.

Like this guide. Having grown up in Canada I know snow.

This inscription can be found on the front of the James Farley Post Office in Manhattan, NYC at 8th Avenue and 33rd Street. The inscription was chosen by William Mitchell Kendall of the firm of McKim, Mead & White, the architects who designed the building in 1912. The sentence appears in the works of Herodotus (in Greek) and describes the expedition of the Greeks against the Persians under Cyrus, about 500 BCE. The Persians operated a system of mounted postal couriers, and the sentence describes the fidelity with which their work was done.

The Central Post Office on Jaffa Road in Jerusalem is a Mandatory style building built between 1934 and 1938 to the design of the main architect of the public works department of the British Mandate, Austen St. Barbe Harrison and government architect Percy Harold Winter. Harrison also designed the Rockefeller Museum and the British High Commissioner’s residence in Armon HaNatziv.

I have photos of Jerusalem in the snow from last January here.

Advertisements

Jerusalem the White City

I woke up this morning to Jerusalem covered in a blanket of snow. It’s not that I haven’t seen snow before, I grew up in Ottawa, Canada but it’s still pretty amazing to have snow in Israel. The meteorological service had been promising snow for Jerusalem since Tuesday. We bundled up and walked to the Old City and I shot photos until my camera lens fogged up.

We walked from the German Colony past Cinemateque and Ben Hinnom valley up Mount Zion. I shot a photo of Yemin Moshe from there. While writing this post and organizing the photographs I came across this black and white photo, photographer unknown from 1920. Similar photo, the cypress and pine trees are bigger, Montefiore’s windmill was recently renovated.

Yemin Moshe Yemin Moshe in snow 1920

We walked through the Jewish quarter past the Byzantine Cardo and the Hurva synagogue. It was snowing and I caught the snow falling in the photo. The photo of the Hurva synagogue with minaret and palm tree has quite a painterly feel.

Byzantine cardo in snow

Hurva synagogue w minaret in snow

I had planned to go up onto the Haram el-Sharif but there was no access for non-Muslims and even the rooftop lookout at the Austrain Hospice was closed. There is a place with a good view above the Kotel plaza. This photo was shot with a 11-16mm wide-angle lens, giving quite a panorama.

Overlooking Kotel Plaza in snow

On our way home I got a nice photo of the “Tower of David” at Jaffa gate.

Tower of David

Snow in Jerusalem

Yes, it snowed in Jerusalem. Amazingly there was even snow at Herodium in the Judean desert and at Makhtesh Ramon in the Negev. This photo is at the hursha, a small grove of mostly pine trees, a couple of blocks from where I live. There are also olive trees growing there. It’s a wonderful place to escape the city, without even having to leave the neighborhood. I often take our golden retriever, Sumsum, there to romp and play.