Tag Archives: photo of week

Photo of the Week – Kurkar on Beach

Running parallel to the Mediterranean coastline of Israel are three underwater sandstone ridges (and two on land). These were created about a million years ago when sea sand dunes fossilized, creating eolianite rock, called kurkar.

Kurkar/Eolianite rockYou can click on the image for a larger view (which may take some time to load depending on your Internet connection). Please share this post with your friends by clicking on the icons at the end of this message.

The technical details – the photo was taken with a Nikon D90 DSLR and 18-70mm lens in June (ISO 200, 18mm, F10 at 1/250 sec).

Photographs on this website are © Shmuel Browns (unless marked otherwise) – if you are interested in purchasing one of my photos or using one of my photos for your own project please contact me.

Photo of the Week on Golan Trail

The Golan Trail is a 125km trail from Mount Hermon to the Sea of Galilee. This photo was taken while hiking the trail near Alonei HaBashan.

Trees on GolanYou can click on the image for a larger view (which may take some time to load depending on your Internet connection). Please share this post with your friends by clicking on the icons at the end of this message.

The technical details – the photo was taken with a Nikon D90 DSLR and 18-70mm lens in April (ISO 250, 70mm, F10 at 1/250 sec).

Photographs on this website are © Shmuel Browns (unless marked otherwise) – if you are interested in purchasing one of my photos or using one of my photos for your own project please contact me.

Photo of the Week – Nahal Darga

A limestone canyon formed by water erosion over many years beckons – Nahal Darga runs to the Dead Sea. Water fills depressions in the stone floor of the canyon so there are places on this hike where you have to swim across pools of water. Make sure to put your camera (I brought along a smaller one on this hike), car key and cell phone in a watertight container so they won’t get wet.

Please share this post with your friends by clicking on one of the icons below

Nahal Darga

The technical details – the photo was taken with a Lumix (point and shoot) digital camera on March 26 (ISO 80, 4.1mm, F3.5 at 1/100 sec).

Photographs on this website are © Shmuel Browns (unless marked otherwise) – if you are interested in purchasing one of my photos or using one of my photos for your own project please contact me.

Photo of the Week – Meron Synagogue Ruins

According to Shamai, the first century Jewish sage, Rosh Hodesh Shvat (the new month) is the New Year of Trees – of course, we go by Hillel’s opinion that says the 15th of the month. This photo shows the ruins of the 3rd century synagogue on Mount Meron with a tree in the foreground. Both Hillel and Shamai are buried at Meron. I chose this photo as an example of a new photographic exhibit I’m working on that is called “Wild and Sacred Places”. Many ruins and tombs, revered as holy sites, have a large, old tree growing nearby.

Today I received an email from a German expat, Florian Seidel, living in Osaka, Japan who is into “urban exploration”, a term that I heard for the first time. With many abandoned or yet to be developed archaeological sites Israel would be a great place for urbex. For example, the synagogue in Meron was destroyed by the earthquake of 409CE. Coins were found at Meron from the Decapolis city at Sussita/Hippos that was destroyed in the Golan earthquake of 749CE and never rebuilt. Both are haikyo (廃墟 abandoned places) and fascinating to explore.

Meron synagogueYou can click on the image for a larger view (which may take some time to load depending on your Internet connection). Please share this post with your friends by clicking on the icons at the end of this message.

The technical details – the photo was taken with a Nikon D70 digital SLR and 18-70mm lend in September (ISO 200, 31mm, F4 at 1/1600 sec).

Photographs on this website are © Shmuel Browns (unless marked otherwise) – if you are interested in purchasing one of my photos or using one of my photos for your own project please contact me.

Photo of the Week – Mystical Tzfat

With the expulsion of the Jews from Spain in 1492, many prominent rabbis found their way to Safed (in Hebrew, Tzfat), among them the Kabbalists Isaac Luria and Moshe Kordovero; Joseph Caro, the author of the Shulchan Aruch and Shlomo Halevi Alkabetz, composer of the Sabbath hymn Lecha Dodi. They are buried in the cemetery, their graves traditionally painted sky-blue, at the foot of the mountain south of the city.

Safed came to be regarded as one of the four holy cities along with Jerusalem, Hebron and Tiberias. Safed is associated with the element of air, a reference to the mystical/spiritual branch of Judaism, Kabbalah that flourished there.

Mystical TzfatYou can click on the image for a larger view (which may take some time to load depending on your Internet connection). Please share this post with your friends by clicking on the icons at the end of this message.

The technical details – the photo was taken with a Nikon D90 digital camera in May (ISO 3200, 29mm, F13 at 1/800 sec).

Photographs on this website are © Shmuel Browns (unless marked otherwise) – if you are interested in purchasing one of my photos or using one of my photos for your own project please contact me.

Photo of the Week – Aqueduct to Caesarea

When visiting the archaeological site at Caesarea don’t miss the lovely beach just north of the site with the aqueduct. The aqueduct was built by King Herod to bring water from the Shuni spring, south of Mount Carmel, about 10km to the northeast to the city. In the second century, to provide additional water, a second aqueduct was built alongside the first by the 10th legion under the Emperor Hadrian that brought water from Tanninim (Crocodiles) river. The aqueduct continued to supply water to Caesarea for 1200 years.

Aquaduct to CaesareaYou can click on the image for a larger view (which may take some time to load depending on your Internet connection). Please share this post with your friends by clicking on the icons at the end of this message.

The technical details – the photo was taken with a Nikon point and shoot camera in May (ISO 100, 11mm, F8.8 at 1/218 sec).

For more information about the archaeological site of Caesarea see my post at https://israeltours.wordpress.com/2011/01/03/caesarea-maritima-herods-promontory-palace/

Photographs on this website are © Shmuel Browns (unless marked otherwise) – if you are interested in purchasing one of my photos or using one of my photos for your own project please contact me.

Photo of the Week near Avdat

Route <40> connects the city of Beersheva in the middle of the Negev to the makhtesh, a unique geological formation at Mitzpe Ramon. Avdat, founded by the Nabateans in the 3rd century BCE, was the most important city on the Incense Route after Petra, “the rose-red city half as old as time” for some eight centuries until its destruction by earthquake in the early 7th century CE. This photo was taken across from Avdat in the area of Ramilye cisterns.

near AvdatYou can click on the image for a larger view (which may take some time to load depending on your Internet connection). Please share this post with your friends by clicking on the icons at the end of this message.

The technical details – the photo was taken with a Nikon D90 DSLR and 18-70mm lens in November (ISO 200, 18mm, F10 at 1/320 sec).

For more information about the Negev see my post at https://israeltours.wordpress.com/2009/10/26/negev-desert/

Photographs on this website are © Shmuel Browns (unless marked otherwise) – if you are interested in purchasing one of my photos or using one of my photos for your own project please contact me.